Imogene Davis

Davis Bobcat

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

University of Georgia

idavis(at)srel.uga.edu


Education

2010 B.S. - Animal Science, North Carolina State University

2015 M.S. - Biology, West Texas A&M University 2015


Research Interests

My research interests are mediated by the desire to conserve biodiversity as well as study landscape connectivity regarding natural resource problems in conservation biology. I aim to conduct research focusing on landscape genetics, conservation genetics, and the population ecology of highly mobile as well as sensitive species. Broadly, I am interested in correlations between landscape composition (as well as change) and gene flow (= movement) in order to provide information on the biological processes that impact local adaptation and population success. I enjoy combining molecular ecology with field work, particularly at high elevation and in low temperatures. As a research technician in the Lance Lab, I assist with a variety of molecular and ecotoxicology projects across an array of taxa. I also work on the genetic marker development program. Currently, I am focusing on the costs of reproduction in Ambystomatid salamanders and the population genetics of the endangered striped newt (Notophthlamus perstriatus) in Florida.

For my CV, please click here.

Honors and Awards

  • Graduate Research Assistantship, West Texas A&M University 2012-2015
  • West Texas A&M University Killgore Research Symposium Graduate Presentation Award 2015
  • West Texas A&M University Resident Designated Graduate Tuition Scholarship 2013, 2014, 2015
  • West Texas A&M University Killgore Research Grants, 2013, 2014
  • Tom Kritser Academic Scholarship, West Texas A&M University 2013
  • Travel Grants, West Texas A&M University 2013
  • Travel Grant, Montana Chapter of The Society for Conservation Biology, 2013

Professional Affiliations

  • The Wildlife Society
  • Texas Chapter of The Wildlife Society
  • Molecular Ecology Working Group of The Wildlife Society
  • Women of Wildlife, Southwest Region of The Wildlife Society

Publications

  • Davis, I.A., R.T. Kazmaier, J.E. Janecka, and R. Ward. Scale-dependent landscape differentiation and the impact of environmental variables on the genetic structure of bobcats (Lynx rufus) across western Texas. In prep for Molecular Ecology.
  • Janecka, J.E., M.E. Tewes, I.A. Davis, A. Haines, A. Caso, T. Blankenship, and R.L. Honeycutt. Comparative impacts of fragmentation on landscape genetics of a habitat generalist and specialist, the bobcat and ocelot. In prep for Conservation Genetics.

Presentations

*denotes presenter, denotes award-winning presentation


  • *Sprauer, S.E., J.C. Broderick, I.A. Davis, R.K. Newbury, and J.E. Janecka. 2015. Exploring the adaptations of bobcats to diverse ecosystems by identifying genomic regions under selection. The Wildlife Society Annual Conference. Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. (talk)
  • *Sprauer, S.E., J.C. Broderick, I.A. Davis, R.K. Newbury, and J.E. Janecka. 2015. Exploring the adaptations of bobcats to diverse ecosystems by identifying genomic regions under selection. Duquesne University Undergraduate Research Symposium. Pittsburgh, PA. (poster)
  • *Davis, I.A., Ward, R., and Richard T. Kazmaier. 2015. The genetic structure of bobcats in western Texas. West Texas A&M University Killgore Research Symposium. Canyon, TX. (talk)
  • *Davis, I.A., Ward, R., and Richard T Kazmaier. 2015. Landscape effects on bobcat genetic structure across ecoregions in West Texas. The Texas Chapter of The Wildlife Society, Corpus Christi, Texas. (talk)
  • *Davis, I.A., Ward, R., and Richard T Kazmaier. 2014. Putative genetic structure of bobcats in the Texas Panhandle. West Texas A&M University Student Research Conference, Canyon, TX. (talk)
  • *Davis, I.A., Ward, R., and Richard T. Kazmaier. 2014. Landscape-scale differentiation in gene flow of mesocarnivores in the Texas Panhandle. The Texas Chapter of The Wildlife Society, Austin, Texas. (talk)
  • *Davis, I.A., Hobbs, R., and J. Howard. 2010. Optimizing oocyte quality for in vitro embryo production in the clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa). The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute Intern Symposium, Front Royal, Virginia. (talk)

The content and opinions expressed on this web page do not necessarily reflect the views of nor are they endorsed by the University of Georgia or the University System of Georgia. Jason O'Bryhim & Stacey Lance 2013